Take the Wheel!

In cycling, there is a phrase known as “taking the wheel”.  The phrase refers to taking thecycling lead in a pack that is drafting.  The leader creates an aerodynamic “bubble” that allows others to take advantage of the slip stream and conserve energy.  In fact, the work of the leader and the pack that follows allows the entire group to ride faster and conserve energy!

As leaders, there are things we can learn from this cycling analogy in our own work with educators on our campuses or in our districts.  We are always trying to develop our team and encourage them to achieve goals and improve the work of the team members, individually and collectively.  Knowing the most effective actions a leader can take in steering the process of collaborative improvement is critical.  Let’s take a look at some of the principles of “taking the wheel” that can help us as leaders:

  1. If you’re the stronger rider, take the wheel!

In cycling if you’re a strong rider you are expected to take the lead for the group and help pull everyone else towards the goal. follow-my-lead

As a leader on your campus or in your district, you’re staff is expecting you to take the lead and help to pull them towards the goal and to encourage them to push on even when they are tired and ready to stop.  Leaders aren’t afraid of challenging headwinds and they refuse to allow excuses to rise up and prevent the team from charging towards the intended goals.

  1. Be a mindful leader!

The leader who takes the wheel is allowing the riders who follow to recover by riding in aerodynamic slipstream that forms behind the leader.  The bubble can actually extend to 7 or 8 riders behind the leader.  This can prove helpful for the pack in keeping them fresh cycling-2and together but the leader has to remember to watch the pace of the ride and the terrain ahead.  If riders aren’t prepared they can easily be dropped from the pack and might not be able to catch up to the pack once left behind.

As a leader on your campus or in your district, you too need to be a mindful leader.  You have to monitor if or when your followers need a rest and when the pace of work needs to be adjusted.  You have to be watching the terrain ahead and prepare your followers for what is coming.  The goal for the leader is to not “drop” anyone along the way.  The best leaders help their team set attainable goals with clear markers along the way.  They know that progress can be its on motivator and they ensure that the whole team experiences that progress.

  1. Know when to lead and know when to follow!

In cycling, if you tend to follow too often and are reluctant to do any work in leading out you’ll be labeled lazy and considered a “follower”.  In cycling terminology, a competent rider never wants to be labeled a follower.  On the flip side, jumping out to the lead too often or for too long can lead some to be seen as the hero for sacrificing themselves for the good of the team.  They can also be seen as a sort of donkey with no brains for failing to use their efforts more wisely.

As a leader on your campus or in your district, it’s imperative that you undergatens-leaders-followersstand your team and your organization well enough so you can lead when you need to but follow when necessary as well.  Understanding that giving others on the team who have better or different skill sets than others a chance to lead is important if the team is going to improve and getter better at what they do.  As a leader, if you’re always out front you will get burned out and your effectiveness will diminish as other team members crave a chance to lead or grow tired of looking at the same back side.  By developing other leaders who can take the wheel for your team, you develop capacity in your team and relieve yourself from being the only one who breaks new ground.

  1. Equipment can make all the difference!

I can remember when I started riding as part of my training for a spring triathlon.  I used my hybrid “get around” bike and it often times seemed like I was pedaling a bike with cement tires.  Once I finally invested in a true road bike, not only did my times improve but riding was actually enjoyable!

As a leader on your campus or in your district, do you have the right equipment?  Do your plan-prepare-performteam members have the right equipment?  If your organization is going to meet the goals set before them, they will be more likely to
do so if they have access to the right kind of data along with coaching in how to use the data and time in which to do the work it takes to improve instruction.  How about professional development?  Equipment makes a difference but the skill and competence of the rider has to improve to get the most out of the equipment.  It works the same way with our teachers.  Leaders have to develop the skills, talents, and understandings of their staff in order to maximize the benefits of having the right tools.

Campus Principals: Do you attend PD with your teachers?

I left the campus principal role a few years ago and moved into central office to lead curriculum and instruction at the district level.  One of the things I still try to keep as a priority is to attend PD sessions with district teachers and leaders.  I do this to monitor the quality of the PD I am sending district staff to but I also do it to build my own knoteachlearnblocks1wledge and skills while also connecting with the teachers in my district.  I want my teachers to know I’m approachable, I don’t have all the answers, but I’m willing to learn new things and I want to stay in tune with what is happening in the classroom.

I believe most campus principals share my thoughts.  Campus principals are always thinking about professional development for their staff and looking for ways to improve student learning through better teaching.  Campus principals know an effective professional development (PD) plan can be one of the best ways to improve student learning and develop a cohesive campus culture.  All too often the campus principal is the one providing the professional development to the staff or is responsible for authorizing and sending staff members to various PD opportunities.  However, I suggest one aspect of PD that principals should consider more carefully is the process of learning alongside their staff.  Yeah, that’s right!  Principals should attend PD with their teachers and learn with them.

There are 4 good reasons why principals should attend PD sessions with their teachers.  I hope the 4 reasons I’m going to share with you inspire you to join your staff in learning at an upcoming PD opportunity.

  1. It’s Fun!
    • It’s easy for principals to get caught up in the day to day administrivia. There are many days where principals can feel far removed from the teaching and learning that goes on each day at the campus because of the administrative duties that come with the position.  Principals should be the instructional leader for the campus and while most principals love the chakeep-calm-fun-learningllenge of leading a campus, they also know that it comes with a price that often times removes them from being directly involved with student learning like when they were still teaching.  By going to PD with their teachers, principals get the opportunity to reconnect with the skills and experiences that attracted them to education in the first place.
    • Getting out to a PD workshop with teachers can make the process of staying current on best practices and researched-based instruction much more interesting, engaging, and relevant. Don’t just read an article or a book but rather jump in with your teachers and learn in an authentic and meaningful way!  That is much more fun!
  2. Learn about and relate to your staff!
    • Much like sitting down at a meal builds fellowship and helps one get to know someone, attending PD with your staff and learning beside them is a bonding experience. By participating in PD, you get to engage with your staff in a way that is different than the typical supervisory roles and duties principals take on.  By learning with your teachers you get to see their thinking and understand what they value and how they reflect on their practices.  Opportunities for deeper discussions about learning and the teaching craft can occur in an authentic setting like a PD workshop.
    • Also, don’t bail out at the lunch break to go answer emails and return calls. Take the lunch break and go eat with your staff.  Again, this provides wonderful opportunities to learn more about the personal side of your teachers and you can share similar stories and happenings as well.
  3. Show them you are a learner too!
    • When you attend PD sessions with your teachers you let them know that you are a lifelong learner and are willing to acquire new skills and ulead-learnernderstandings as well. It shows them that you are vulnerable and interested in the things they do day in and day out with their students all year.  It will also provide you a natural connection to deeper conversations later in the year as you and your teachers reflect on what was learned at the PD and how they are implementing it in their classroom. You will also have a better understanding of how the PD fits with the initiatives and goals of the campus from firsthand experience.
  4. Identify potential leaders!
    • Another aspect of attending PD with your teachers that can pay off in the long run is the opportunity to identify potential leaders on your campus. By engaging with teachers in PD you will begin to see which teachers are natural leaders in those kinds of settings but you will also be able to sei-am-a-leadere your thinkers, dreamers, and even your pioneers who are willing to lead the charge!
    • By having a deeper and more authentic understanding of the skills and personalities of your teachers, you can better match leadership opportunities with teachers on your campus. You don’t have to leave it to chance or to those who always tend to lead but instead can tap into the experiences you had with your teachers during the PD and connect the traits you saw in your teachers with the opportunities on the campus.

So this is a call to all principals (and even central office leaders), go find some PD opportunities for your teachers and be an active participant with them!  You just might find you enjoy the opportunity to learn with your staff while at the same time building trust, competence, and a culture of collaboration!

We can’t afford not to invest in our teachers!

I read a very compelling article in the Harvard Business Review last month that highlighted the steps one fast food company in Tennessee uses to build a high functioning culture while attracting and keeping key personnel in an industry that is notoriously transient and arbitrary.

Click here for the story.

In the article Thomas Crosby, CEO of Pal’s Sudden Service, discusses how they build a culture of consistency, high performance, skill building, and success.  As a an educator that leads curriculum and instruction work for a district along with teacher induction and professional development programs, I was quick to note his big three points align quite well with the work all educational leaders should embark upon in their daily work with developing teachers and other staff on the campus.

While often times looking at a business world model for improvement can break down at some point when trying to compare it to the education world where we do not control the quality of the raw materials at the outset nor do we remove or kick out imperfect raw materials during the process of teaching students, the truths of this article can stand the test of time and cross over to the educational arena.

  1. The best companies hire for attitude and train for skill–As educational leaders, we can sometimes become overly focused on the content that needs to be taught and particular skill sets or backgrounds that teachers possess when we hire.  We will be better served (and so will our students) if we, instead, focus on exactly what kind of character and attitude our current and aspiring teaching staff possess and realize that we can teach and develop skill but the core of a person is much more difficult to mold.  Lesson for leaders: define and know what your core values are for your staff and your campus and skillfully measure anyone who wants to be part of your staff by those standards.
  2. Even great people need constant opportunities for improvement–As an educational leader, how do you check the “calibration” of your staff?  Just like machines, people can become uncalibrated.  We have to be specific and purposeful in how we design our professional development and how we ensure that our teaching staff participates in the appropriate and necessary type, style, and amount of training.  Moreover, we have to provide opportunities for our most talented educators to share what they know with others and to be a vessel for others to fulfill that constant need for improvement opportunities.
  3. Leaders who are serious about hiring also have to be serious about teaching–As an educational leader, one has to be committed to modeling an insatiable desire to learn for the entire campus.  Michael Fullan describes this as being a “lead learner”.  The most successful leaders formalize the learning and teaching (sharing) expectations for their campus or organization.  Pursuing knowledge and sharing the learning from that pursuit cannot be optional.

So there you have it.  Three statements of truth that work for leaders whether yTwo handsour running a fast food burger shop or a comprehensive high school or even a school district.
It matters what we do (or don’t do) when it comes to investing in our teachers and other instructional staff.  While some may argue that the task is too difficult or that there isn’t enough money/time or that it takes too much money/time, a quote by Thomas Crosby sums it up quite well:

“People ask me, ‘What if you spend all this time and money on training and someone leaves?’” Crosby says. “I ask them, ‘What if we don’t spend the time and money, and they stay?’”

-CS

 

Let Actions mirror Intention

“We judge ourselves by our intentions and others by their behavior.”

Stephen Covey used this powerful quote when he taught about leadership and the 7 Habits of Highly Effective People.  The quote speaks to the notion of judging others and determining the value of their actions and their intentions.  The quote is simple, yet holds profound implications for leaders and how they interact with and lead their organizations.

What it really gets to the heart of is trust.  As leaders, we always have the eyes of our organization looking at us.  For educators, thCovey_Jude othersat can be a grade level or team, a campus, a department, or the district itself.  It’s imperative that leaders understand they have align their intentions with their actions.  If actions run counter to intentions, those who follow the leader will develop their own interpretation of the intent of the actions the leader displays.

Leaders would do well to remember two things with regard to this idea of judging behavior and intent:

  1. Be aware of one’s own bias in judging the behaviors of others and what might be the intent of that individual’s choices.  A deeper conversation with that individual just might bring better clarity as to why that person does what he/she does.
  2. Be aware of one’s own bias to assess one’s own actions through a “softer” intention-focused lens.  Individuals can tend to allow themselves more slack or forgiveness because of their noble intentions but that doesn’t excuse poor choices or misaligned actions on the leader’s part.

 

-leadinglearningmatters

Will 2016 finally be the year that educational ecosystems change…for the better?

Well, here comes 2016.  Another year, another opportunity to actually change education for the better!  This week I was reminded of an article that came out on the MindShift blog way back in 2013.  Yep, that’s right I’m about to refer to an article that was a call to action two years ago and still has so much to say to us even today.

The call to action I’m referring to is the challenge to change the educational ecosystem in your classroom, your campus, your district, or wherever your sphere of influence may imBe-Brave-1024x768pact.  A change in new federal law, ESSA, governing education has created yet another opportunity for educators to dive in and look at our practices, our beliefs, and our bravery.  Bravery?  You read that correctly.  Educators now more than ever, at least more than in the last 15 years, have an opportunity redirect and redesign the environment of the classroom and the campus and create true inquiry based learning that promotes deep thinking, deeper understanding, and authentic learning.

Administrators have to give their teachers the autonomy and trust to develop deeper learning experiences in the classrooms.  We must also know our teachers well enough, individually and as teams, to provide them the professional development and entrepreneurial environment that allows for these changes to occur.

Teachers have to push away the built in excuse that says they can’t because their principals or district won’t let them.  Educators have to tap into their own deep inquiry into practices and pedagogy to advocate and pursue what is best for students.  Teachers don’t have to beEducational Ecosystem tools of the district or a policy or an initiative.  Dig into the research that supports your gut and your intuition and what you know is best for students.  Go to your campus and district leadership with data, research, and the fruit of your labors and prove what you know is best!

Let’s all take this opportunity to be one of the brave!  Let’s be true practitioners of education!  Let’s make 2016 be the year where education truly did change…for the better…for students!