Campus Principals: Do you attend PD with your teachers?

I left the campus principal role a few years ago and moved into central office to lead curriculum and instruction at the district level.  One of the things I still try to keep as a priority is to attend PD sessions with district teachers and leaders.  I do this to monitor the quality of the PD I am sending district staff to but I also do it to build my own knoteachlearnblocks1wledge and skills while also connecting with the teachers in my district.  I want my teachers to know I’m approachable, I don’t have all the answers, but I’m willing to learn new things and I want to stay in tune with what is happening in the classroom.

I believe most campus principals share my thoughts.  Campus principals are always thinking about professional development for their staff and looking for ways to improve student learning through better teaching.  Campus principals know an effective professional development (PD) plan can be one of the best ways to improve student learning and develop a cohesive campus culture.  All too often the campus principal is the one providing the professional development to the staff or is responsible for authorizing and sending staff members to various PD opportunities.  However, I suggest one aspect of PD that principals should consider more carefully is the process of learning alongside their staff.  Yeah, that’s right!  Principals should attend PD with their teachers and learn with them.

There are 4 good reasons why principals should attend PD sessions with their teachers.  I hope the 4 reasons I’m going to share with you inspire you to join your staff in learning at an upcoming PD opportunity.

  1. It’s Fun!
    • It’s easy for principals to get caught up in the day to day administrivia. There are many days where principals can feel far removed from the teaching and learning that goes on each day at the campus because of the administrative duties that come with the position.  Principals should be the instructional leader for the campus and while most principals love the chakeep-calm-fun-learningllenge of leading a campus, they also know that it comes with a price that often times removes them from being directly involved with student learning like when they were still teaching.  By going to PD with their teachers, principals get the opportunity to reconnect with the skills and experiences that attracted them to education in the first place.
    • Getting out to a PD workshop with teachers can make the process of staying current on best practices and researched-based instruction much more interesting, engaging, and relevant. Don’t just read an article or a book but rather jump in with your teachers and learn in an authentic and meaningful way!  That is much more fun!
  2. Learn about and relate to your staff!
    • Much like sitting down at a meal builds fellowship and helps one get to know someone, attending PD with your staff and learning beside them is a bonding experience. By participating in PD, you get to engage with your staff in a way that is different than the typical supervisory roles and duties principals take on.  By learning with your teachers you get to see their thinking and understand what they value and how they reflect on their practices.  Opportunities for deeper discussions about learning and the teaching craft can occur in an authentic setting like a PD workshop.
    • Also, don’t bail out at the lunch break to go answer emails and return calls. Take the lunch break and go eat with your staff.  Again, this provides wonderful opportunities to learn more about the personal side of your teachers and you can share similar stories and happenings as well.
  3. Show them you are a learner too!
    • When you attend PD sessions with your teachers you let them know that you are a lifelong learner and are willing to acquire new skills and ulead-learnernderstandings as well. It shows them that you are vulnerable and interested in the things they do day in and day out with their students all year.  It will also provide you a natural connection to deeper conversations later in the year as you and your teachers reflect on what was learned at the PD and how they are implementing it in their classroom. You will also have a better understanding of how the PD fits with the initiatives and goals of the campus from firsthand experience.
  4. Identify potential leaders!
    • Another aspect of attending PD with your teachers that can pay off in the long run is the opportunity to identify potential leaders on your campus. By engaging with teachers in PD you will begin to see which teachers are natural leaders in those kinds of settings but you will also be able to sei-am-a-leadere your thinkers, dreamers, and even your pioneers who are willing to lead the charge!
    • By having a deeper and more authentic understanding of the skills and personalities of your teachers, you can better match leadership opportunities with teachers on your campus. You don’t have to leave it to chance or to those who always tend to lead but instead can tap into the experiences you had with your teachers during the PD and connect the traits you saw in your teachers with the opportunities on the campus.

So this is a call to all principals (and even central office leaders), go find some PD opportunities for your teachers and be an active participant with them!  You just might find you enjoy the opportunity to learn with your staff while at the same time building trust, competence, and a culture of collaboration!

Chunk & Chew: Giving Learners Processing Time

How brain friendly is your classroom?  In the race to cover material and teach concepts/skills, do your students have time during their “learning” to actually process the things being taught?  In almost any lesson there is new or essential information presented to students.  Some times students are able to acquire this information without much difficulty while other times, it can be quite the challenge and even interfere with mastery of the essential learning goal.

In Robert Marzano’s seminal book, The Art and Science of Teaching, he shares one strategy that can prove to be very effective for students when trying to help them acquire new information or essential concepts/skills.  Instead of forcing large amounts of new information on students at one time or during an extended amount of time, he recommends “chunking” the information.  Chunking is the process of taking essential information and breaking it into small, digestible bits that allow students to understand the information more deeply while also making connections and building context for deeper understanding.

Spence Rogers adds to this idea by allowing for processing time as well and calls it the “10-2 Rule“.  For every ten minutes of instruction, students should be given two minutes to process or interact with the information.  I like to think of this in t10-2erms of pouring a bottle of soda into a glass.  At one point the glass will be filled and there will still be soda left in the bottle to be poured (more information).  You can either keep
pouring it and spill the soda all over the counter OR you can take the time to drink some from the glass which will allow you to pour more soda into the glass.  Our students, all learners really, are like that glass.  They must be given the time to process the information we are sending their way.  For younger students, this time can be even shorter than 10 minutes.  Another good rule of thumb to use is no more than one minute per year of age before taking a break for processing.  So if you’re teaching an 8 year old (2nd grade), you should be stopping every eight minutes or so to give them a couple minutes to process the information, concept, or skill.

I tend to use the term “chunk and chew” when I refer to this processing time within instruction.  There are lots of ways in which teachers can chewimplement a processing time within their lessons.  It doesn’t have to just be a stop, turn and talk, then back to the lesson process.  A few other examples of effective processing strategies include:

 

  • Think-Pair-Share:  Teacher teaches.  Teacher asks asks a question or gives a problem.  Teacher asks partners to think about it on their own.  Partners take turns sharing their thoughts.
  • Mix-Pair-Share:  Teacher teaches.  Group mixes around the room (music playing in background helps).  Teacher tells students to pair up with nearest student.  Teacher gives them a topic to discuss.  Mix again and repeat.
  • Round Robin:  Team numbers off (1-4).  Teacher assigns a task, question, or problem.  Teammates answers question in turn order.  Teacher leads a whole group discussion to verify and clarify.
  • Four Corners:  Teacher has the room divided into four areas/regions/corners with a theme or answer choice (stongly agree, agree, disagree, strongly disagree).  Teacher gives a prompt and students move to the corner that aligns with their their thoughts/understanding.  Students form groups of two or three in their corner and discuss their ideas further.  Students can then report out their ideas to the whole class.  (A spinoff or extension of this could be to let the students choose a new corner after hearing from all of the groups to see if they have changed their mind.)

These are just a few simple and fairly common strategies teachers can use with their students to give them processing time.  Some of them even have the added advantage of being kinesthetic and tapping into multiple learning styles which is also an important consideration in helping students master new information, concepts, and skills.

I hope you’ll give this notion of “chunk and chew” a try in your classroom and if you have other strategies or ideas, please share them as comments to the blog so others can learn as well!